How To Use Pinterest For Business as an Indie Author, Part Two

So, last time, we created your first board and pin. This time, we’ll want to see how they’re doing! That’s where Pinterest Analytics comes in. Remember: we’re working under the assumption that A) you’re pretty much a beginner and B) you have a Pinterest business account. If you don’t, this next part may not make a whole lot of sense–because you won’t see the features I’m discussing.

howtousepinterestforbusinessasanindieauthorparttwo

Open your Pinterest account. At the top, on the left-hand side, you should see Analytics. If you scroll over this word, you should get a drop-down menu with several options. For me, those options are: Overview, Profile, People You Reach, and Website. If you don’t see Website you may not yet have confirmed your website with Pinterest. More on that in a minute.

Overview

overview
This will take you to your main Analytics dashboard, where you can see snapshots of the stats for each of the available categories. If you click the “More” option in each of these categories, guess what? You get more details. Clicking “More” will also take you to the same place the individual options in the Analytics drop-down menu will take you. I typically visit my dashboard before I delve deeper, but see which method you prefer.

You also get an at-a-glance of your top pin impressions (the number of times someone viewed your pins) for the last 30 days. Below this, and below pretty much every statistic box on Pinterest, you’ll also have a “Show More” button, in case you want to see a larger grouping of your pins.

overviewimpressions

Now, let’s go back to that website thing. If you haven’t yet confirmed your website, instead of showing statistics for your site, you’ll see a red button you can click to confirm your website. Because each website is different, I’ll leave it to Pinterest to tell you exactly how you need to handle this for yourself. In my case, there was a hang-up on Pinterest’s end that required some extra assistance. I had this message for about four days, which is a little longer than the possible hour it notes:

errormessage

I ended up contacting the Pinterest help team, and I can’t say enough about how they handled it. I got a reply right away. They told me it looked like they would need to manually confirm my site on their end, and that they’d have it done within 36 hours. Everything was running smoothly in under 24 hours. I liked Pinterest before, but they get extra props from me for helping out so efficiently. I will note that they have an extensive help menu you can go through to troubleshoot on your own. Do take the time to go through that before you contact them directly for help with an issue–it’s got loads of info, and even if you ultimately can’t solve your problem on your own, you’ll learn a lot!

Your Pinterest Profile

yourpinterestprofile
Go ahead and click “More” on Your Pinterest profile card. This will take you to all the options for your profile. Across the top, you can choose from several categories. You can see an overview of your impressions, broken down by individual pins and boards, along with what action people take on those impressions. If you want to take it further, you can select Repins. Again, this is broken down by pins (which pins people save the most) and boards (which boards have the most pins that get saved the most). You can also choose Clicks to see which pins get the most clicks and which boards have the most pins that get clicked. All-time will give you exactly that: your all-time top saved pins; pins that rank highest in searches; and what Pinterest refers to as Power Pins, or “Pins with a high mix of

You can see an overview of your impressions, broken down by individual pins and boards, along with what action people take on those impressions. If you want to take it further, you can select Repins. Again, this is broken down by pins (which pins people save the most) and boards (which boards have the most pins that get saved the most). You can also choose Clicks to see which pins get the most clicks and which boards have the most pins that get clicked. All-time will give you exactly that: your all-time top saved pins; pins that rank highest in searches; and what Pinterest refers to as Power Pins, or “Pins with a high mix of

If you want to take it further, you can select Repins. Again, this is broken down by pins (which pins people save the most) and boards (which boards have the most pins that get saved the most). You can also choose Clicks to see which pins get the most clicks and which boards have the most pins that get clicked. All-time will give you exactly that: your all-time top saved pins; pins that rank highest in searches; and what Pinterest refers to as Power Pins, or “Pins with a high mix of

You can also choose Clicks to see which pins get the most clicks and which boards have the most pins that get clicked. All-time will give you exactly that: your all-time top saved pins; pins that rank highest in searches; and what Pinterest refers to as Power Pins, or “Pins with a high mix of

All-time will give you exactly that: your all-time top saved pins; pins that rank highest in searches; and what Pinterest refers to as Power Pins, or “Pins with a high mix of saves, clicks and more”. This is Pinterest-speak for pins that get the most interaction and engagement overall.

Note that for each of the category options, you can choose to view 7, 14, or 30 days of stats. This counts for the rest of the People You Reach and Website stat views, too.

Now, see that “All Apps” button at the top right? Clicking that will give you a drop-down of all the ways people access Pinterest. If you want to see, for instance, how many of your interactions are coming from people who are using iPads, you can do that here.

Pinterest also peppers your pages with handy tips on how to make the most of your experience. Here’s an example:

pinteresttips

People You Reach

peopleyoureachpinterest
Next, let’s click “More” on your People You Reach card (or you can access it from the Analytics drop-down menu at the top). This will take you to all the options for your audience. Across the top, you can choose from Demographics or Interests. On the Demographics page, you’ll see who makes up your audience. Want to know where do they live or what language they speak? You can find that here.

On the Demographics page, you’ll see who makes up your current audience. Want to know where they live or what languages they speak? You can find that here.

See the “All Audiences” button at the top right? Here you can choose whether you want to view statistics from everyone who sees your pins or statistics for only your followers. This is a great way to see how best to interact with the people who already follow you. Again, you can break these stats down by using the “All Apps” option.

Under Interests, you can learn what else your audience likes. You can also see boards that share your pins and what other apps and brands your audience uses.

This is excellent information if you want to target the things you share to the interests of the people you’re reaching.

On the other hand, if the people you’re reaching don’t appear to be your target audience–based on their interests and the other apps and brands they connect with–you can makes choices about how to tailor your content in the future to more closely reach your target group.

Website

pinterestwebsiteactivity
Finally, let’s take a look at the Website card. Since my website confirmation problem was just resolved, this section is looking a little blah! Hopefully, now that I’ve gotten everything linked up, I’ll be seeing some stats here soon.

Again, you have plenty of options to choose from, and it’s a lot like the section for your profile, only this time the info deals with how people interact with pins saved from your website.

Impressions will give you an idea of how new images you share on your site are doing on Pinterest. This might give you some insight into what types of images people prefer to see on your site.

Repins, as always, will show you how many times a pin has been saved. This lets you see how your subject matter does across Pinterest as a whole.

Clicks will tell you how many times people go back to your website from Pinterest. Getting two-way traffic like this should absolutely be a goal! You want people interested enough in your brand to seek you out directly. You also want people interested enough in your content that they go back to the source for more!

Original Pins–boy, oh, boy am I looking forward to getting my first one of these. This will show you who saved something from your site to Pinterest. A great way to encourage this (and Pinterest will encourage you to take advantage of it) is to use the “Pin It” or Pinterest save button. Pinterest offers several types–you can build one through their site. Make it as easy as possible for your audience to share your content!

All-time shows you the most saves/shares from your site along with which of your pins rank highest when people search on Pinterest and the Power Pins for your website, too.

Remember two paragraphs ago when I said Pinterest will encourage you to use the “Pin It” button? Well, here ya go: Save button. Clicking this will take you through to the builder where you can get your very own button. Go forth and do the thing.

And that, my dears, is your very basic overview of Pinterest Analytics.

What did I miss? Do you have questions or need more info? Let me know in the comments below!

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